Carnival corporation case analysis of strategic management

However, much has happened since it went up, including the Blogger outage. Scroll down for a report on that. More new posts will be added below this one. The essay below is the conclusion of the ninth part in a series by Takuan Seiyo.

Carnival corporation case analysis of strategic management

So he excerpted the less complicated sections, made a few editing and formatting changes, and came up with a shorter, more accessible article. Do you ignore them? Acknowledge the accurate bits? This short column covers all that, but it also addresses a less sexy but ultimately more important topic: It then tries to assess the proper role of outrage management in public participation.

Even assuming your worried stakeholder is wrong about X, he or she may not be irrational — but rather mistrustful, postmodernist, cautious, uninformed, misinformed, intuitive, emotionally upset, motivated by personal or social values, or pursuing a different agenda.

When we ignore these possibilities and assume our risk-averse stakeholders are irrational, the column suggests, we raise questions about our own rationality. December 12, Month after month, this is one of the least often read of my major columns.

It covers an outrage management strategy I consider one of the most important and most difficult of any on my list: July 27, This column dissects an issue — one of the few — on which I disagree with most risk communication and crisis communication professionals: I urge my clients to let the disagreements show.

Perhaps most importantly, it details what tends to go wrong when organizations muzzle their staff in order to speak with one voice. April 20, This short column has two goals.

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This strategy is fundamental to both crisis communication and outrage management, but it is seldom utilized, largely because it threatens management egos. March 21, This column describes the battles that ensue when activists or journalists are trying to arouse stakeholder outrage about some situation while companies or agencies are trying to reduce that outrage.

Some of what goes on in these battles is symmetrical. Some of what goes on is not symmetrical. December 13, This short column considers the four possibilities when you are trying to convince me of X: Each of these four situations has its own risk communication game, described in the column: Good risk communicators need to master all four games.

Website column by Peter M. Sandman and Jody Lanard Posted: It was widely criticized for alarming people before it had solid evidence that the strain was spreading.

It was widely criticized for the delay.

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Obviously, when to release risk information is a tough call. In this column, Jody Lanard and I lay out the pros and cons, and conclude that early is almost always better than late.

We also analyze the New York City decision in detail, and offer some ways to reduce the downsides of early release. November 11, This column is in two parts. Part Two goes into detail on the toughest part of acknowledging uncertainty: It assesses five biases that tend to distort our judgments about how uncertain to sound, even after we have accepted the principle that we should acknowledge our uncertainty.

Which of the two is likelier to get said when the other would have been closer to the truth? August 28, Most of this long column is addressed to risk communicators whose goal is to keep their audience unconcerned.

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The column details their reluctance even to mention worst case scenarios, and their tendency when they finally get around to discussing them to do so over-reassuringly. It explains why this is unwise — why people especially outraged people tend to overreact to worst case scenarios when the available information is scanty or over-reassuring.

Then the column lists 25 guidelines for explaining worst case scenarios properly. Finally, a postscript addresses the opposite problem.

How can you do that more effectively?

Carnival corporation case analysis of strategic management

March 18, Mad cow disease has never been a serious threat to human health in the United States. When it tries to convince people of this truth, the U. In this long column, Jody Lanard and I painstakingly dissect nine instances of misleading USDA mad cow risk communication in the wake of the December discovery of the first known mad cow in the U.

Not that the USDA was unusually dishonest. This sort of dishonesty is routine in risk communication, especially when its perpetrators know they are in the right.As a follow-up to Tuesday’s post about the majority-minority public schools in Oslo, the following brief account reports the latest statistics on the cultural enrichment of schools in Austria.

Vienna is the most fully enriched location, and seems to be in roughly the same situation as Oslo. Many thanks to Hermes for the translation from tranceformingnlp.com After being taken down twice by Blogger within a single week, we got the message: It’s Time To Go.

Gates of Vienna has moved to a new address. HP needs weeks to ship additional TouchPads, according to a leaked email sent to customers.

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HP is prepping one last run for its defunct tablet. Quick links: Volume 21 Volume 20 Volume 19 Volume 18 Volume 17 Volume 16 Volume 15 Volume 14 Volume 13 Volume 12 Volume 11 Volume 10 Volume 9. Published Articles.

Fred R. David's revision of his popular text gives students of all levels a thorough and interesting introduction to strategic management — one that will show you the value and the excitement of the field.

Archives and past articles from the Philadelphia Inquirer, Philadelphia Daily News, and tranceformingnlp.com

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